Premium WordPress plugin developers, can we have access to your version control please?

We’ve been telling customers to always be on the latest and greatest version of everything WordPress related. It has become the de facto answer to any bug report: “Are you running the latest version of plugin x and y?”. That’s fine, for most use cases. But what if I’m in a situation where I can’t be at the latest version? Or what if I find a bug in the latest version and have to restore to an older version?

Of course, we run our version control for websites. We can restore older versions of plugins after we find a bug. This requires us to have the premium plugin in our own version control, writing our own history. While this works fine, there are a couple really big downsides to this. Continue Reading…

I’m not a sysadmin by any means, but I like to think that I know how to setup a little server environment. Having used Vagrant for a long time now helps, it definitely lowered the bar of getting into it.

One thing that has puzzled me for quite some time, is so silly that I wanted to document it. Maybe I can have a good laugh about it when I look back at this in a couple months. Long story short: PHP uses a different php.ini file for each program it loads in. This can be in the command line, or anything really.

So if you want to install the mcrypt extension for example (in my case on Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install php5-mcrypt) and wonder why it isn’t loading when you use PHP on the command line; make sure the extension is loaded in /etc/php5/cli/php.ini. In case you use PHP-FPM as well, make sure to load the extension in /etc/php5/fpm/php.ini as well.

I have spent hours to find it, only to forget this is a thing a couple weeks later when it showed up again. Call me silly, but a quick Google search learned me that lots of people are struggling with this issue as well. If this post isn’t just going to give me a good laugh when I find it in a couple months, maybe it will help someone who stumbles upon it.

Related Posts for WordPress review, now it is premium

Ever since Barry announced that he’s working on a related posts plugin, I’ve been keeping track of the project. Now that it’s available, the reviews for the free plugin have been five stars all the way, so there must be something good in it, right?

The one thing that has always been a challenge for related posts plugins, is performance. Related Posts for WordPress makes a bold statement about that:

Related Posts for WordPress won’t lag your server!
We don’t think having related posts should slow down your website. That’s why Related Posts for WordPress creates its own cache and does all the heavy lifting in the admin panel, keeping your website fast as it should be!

So it’s free, gets five star reviews all the time and is not making my site any slower? Sounds too good to be true? Well, the new premium version of the plugin adds even more juice. It offers related posts for all (including custom) post types, support for all (custom) taxonomies and themes for the output of the related posts (no coding required). Continue Reading…